Last Light, Muscat

£325.00

Image size: 140.00 x 190.00 mm

An Original Oil Painting

A view of old Muscat that has been taken from a road rarely seen by tourists.

As the light is fading, the fort becomes illuminated in this oil painting, in contrast to the foreground buildings.

The original oil Painting is framed and ready for hanging on the wall available from www.alanreed.com

Product Extras

Description

Original Oil Painting of Last Light Muscat

Last Light Muscat is the title of this new original oil painting featuring a view of old Muscat.  A taxi driver wanting to show me some special views took me to the point where I could photograph this scene.

As the light is fading, the fort becomes illuminated in this oil painting, in contrast to the foreground buildings.

The original oil Painting is framed and ready for hanging on the wall available from www.alanreed.com

Cultural Life

Oman is a tribal society, although tribal influence is gradually declining. Oman is predominately a Muslim population. It observes standards that are less strict than it’s neighbouring countries. The consumption of alcohol, for instance, is illegal for Omani citizens. Alcohol is permissible for visitors in restaurants and hotels. This oil painting of Last Light Muscat is a typical view of the city in the early evening light.

Daily life and social customs

Women in particular have enjoyed relatively more freedom in Oman than elsewhere on the Arabian Peninsula. Social interaction remains largely segregated by gender. Most Omani women particularly those in rural areas dress in a conservative, time-honoured fashion. Traditional attire for women, varies slightly from region to region. The traditional Omani dress for women is characterized by striking coloured fabrics adorned with jewellery. They consists of a dress (thawb) over loose-fitting slacks (sirwāl). A long, flowing scarf known as a liḥāf (or generically as ḥijāb) covers the head. Similarly, most Omani men wear the dishdashah, or thawb, a traditional woven cotton robe. The male head wear consists of a light turban of cotton or wool, known as a muzzar. Many men continue to carry a short, broad, curved, and often highly ornate dagger known as a khanjar (sometimes called a janbiyyah or jambiya). It is worn tucked in the front waistband.

Mealtime serves as the centre of most social gatherings. The typical Omani meal consists of rice, spiced lamb or fish, dates, and coffee or tea. Incense—notably frankincense, which is native to Oman is burned at the end of the meal.

Omanis observe the standard Islamic holidays, including the two eids (festivals). Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha, as well as several secular holidays.  National Day (celebrating the expulsion of the Portuguese in the 17th century) and the ruling sultan’s birthday are national holidays.

Additional information

Dimensions 15.00 × 190.00 × 140.00 cm